The Blind Side Essay On Belonging

The blind side follows the story of Michael Oher, a boy from, ‘Hurt Village’ in the lower side of Memphis, who lives a life of poverty until he is taken care of and then adopted by the Tuoheys, a rich family who own a chain of Taco Bells. They help him improve his grades and develop his NFL skills until he earns a scholarship to Ole Miss University which helps him become a professional NFL player. Belonging in The Blind Side:

During the course of The Blind Side, Michael is transformed from a shy boy living in poverty, into a highly confident and successful sportsman. This change was brought about with the support of the Tuohey family with whom he came to belong after they took care of, then adopted him into their family. This family also helped him break away from the dangerous ‘lower class’ society in which he didn’t really belong, as shown in the scene where he goes back after living with the Tuoheys and gets in a fight with the local gang; and start to belong to the ‘upper class’ society of Wingate which he previously didn’t belong to.

Throughout the film Michael adopts the Tuohey family as his own, as he didn’t belong to his biological family due to the lack of a father, and his moms drug problems, as shown by the terrible flashbacks he has of being forcefully separated from his mother and brothers. Initially Michael rejects the attempts the Tuoheys make to help him as he feels that he doesn’t belong with them due to their position in society and skin colour, as shown by his body language, being conservative as he is always rubbing his arms close to his body. However after he is given a plate at thanksgiving, a huge gesture to him as he struggles for food, he feels as though he belongs with them. This is later confirmed after they include him in their family Christmas card, which is seen as strange to others, like cousin Bobby who asks “Ya’ll know there’s a coloured boy in your Christmas Card”, however the family don’t mind and laugh it off as they know he is part of their family.

Throughout the film it is shown that Michael doesn’t belong in the lower class society where there are no aspirations to become successful, or the upper class society where there are these aspirations; until he becomes part of the Tuohey family. Early in the film Michael is shown to not belong amongst ‘lower class’ as when he is walking by himself along a path, children from this society are playing with each all around him, showing he doesn’t belong with them. When he goes to Wingate he is shunned by the white populous as well, due to his size and skin colour, “like a fly in the milk”.

He doesn’t belong as others ignore him and move away from him when possible, as shown when he tries to talk to the two little girls on swings but they run from him. After the Tuoheys take him however in he learns how to belong with others in their society through improved body language, smiling more, and becoming better known through his sporting prowess. This is revealed when he talks the same two girls and they ask him to push them as they are no longer scared.

This shows how Michael was able to change his life for the better because of a feeling of belonging giving him more confidence, so he could pursue his dream of playing football professionally. It shows the power that belonging in a family has and how society is able to accept or reject its members.

The Blind Side, a 2009 movie based on the book by Michael Lewis, is based on the real-life story of Michael Oher, an NFL offensive tackle who has played on the Tennessee Titans, Baltimore Ravens, and Carolina Panthers. It is the story of how Michael, once a homeless teen, is taken in and cared for by a family called the Tuohys (Sandra Bullock plays his mother, Leigh Anne Tuohy). Once he develops a sense of...

The Blind Side, a 2009 movie based on the book by Michael Lewis, is based on the real-life story of Michael Oher, an NFL offensive tackle who has played on the Tennessee Titans, Baltimore Ravens, and Carolina Panthers. It is the story of how Michael, once a homeless teen, is taken in and cared for by a family called the Tuohys (Sandra Bullock plays his mother, Leigh Anne Tuohy). Once he develops a sense of belonging, he flourishes. 

As portrayed in the film, Michael, an African-American boy, is living with different foster care families in Memphis, Tennessee, when he is admitted to a Christian school, despite his poor grades, to play football. Michael later learns that his father has died. The white Tuohy family, whose children attend the school, see Michael walking down the road at night and invite him to stay at their house when they realize he has nowhere to stay.

Over time, Michael begins to live at their house and become like a member of the family. Leigh Anne seeks to become Michael's guardian and finds out that he has been in foster care since the age of 7, and that his mother has been addicted to drugs. She convinces Michael to improve his football game by telling him that his job is to protect the quarterback, as she realizes that he has strong protective instincts. By the end of the movie, Michael regards the Tuohys as his family, and he begins to feel a sense of belonging that inspires him work to improve his grades and his football game. The movie ends as Michael Oher decides to attend Ole Miss (after which he became a first-round draft pick, though this is not part of the movie).

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